SEMINAR REPORT ON 3D INTERNET


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ABSTRACT

The topic 3D Internet in Web 3.0 is one of the most important technologies world is looking forward to. Generally, we do our things manually in the daily life, which can be said to be in the form of 3D. But when it comes to internet we are actually using it in the form of 2D rather than 3D, hence this concept i.e. 3D Internet helps in achieving that.
3D Internet, also known as virtual worlds, is a powerful new way for you to reach consumers, business customers, co-workers, partners, and students. It combines the immediacy of television, the versatile content of the Web, and the relationship-building strengths of social networking sites like Face book. Yet unlike the passive experience of television, the 3D Internet is inherently interactive and engaging. Virtual worlds provide immersive 3D experiences that replicate (and in some cases exceed) real life.

Introduction

Web 1.0

Companies publish content that people consume (e.g. CNN). In Web 1.0, a small number of writers created Web pages for a large number of readers. As a result, people could get information by going directly to the source: Adobe.com for graphic design issues, Microsoft.com for Windows issues, and CNN.com for news. As personal publishing caught on and went mainstream, it became apparent that the Web 1.0 paradigm had to change. shown fig 1.1.

3D Internet

3D Internet, also known as virtual worlds, is a powerful new way for you to reach consumers, business customers, co-workers, partners, and students. It combines the immediacy of television, the versatile content of the Web, and the relationship-building strengths of social networking sites like Face book. Yet unlike the passive experience of television, the 3D Internet is inherently interactive and engaging. Virtual worlds provide immersive 3D experiences that replicate (and in some cases exceed) real life.
People who take part in virtual worlds stay online longer with a heightened level of interest. To take advantage of that interest, diverse businesses and organizations have claimed an early stake in this fast-growing market. They include technology leaders such as IBM, Microsoft, and Cisco, companies such as BMW, Toyota, Circuit City, Coca Cola, and Calvin Klein, and scores of universities, including Harvard, Stanford and Penn State.

3D Internet: Why?

One of the often heard arguments against the 3D Internet is in the form of the question “why do we need it?” For most of its users the Internet is a familiar, comfortable medium where we communicate with each other, get our news, shop, pay our bills, and more. We are indeed so much used to and dependant on its existence that we don’t think about its nature anymore just like we do not think about Ohm’s law when we turn on the lights. From this perspective what we have, i.e. the 2D version, seems “sufficient” and the 3D Internet is yet another fad. However, if we stop and think about the nature of the Internet for a moment we realize that it is nothing but a virtual environment (cyberspace) where people and organizations interact with each other and exchange information. Once this fact is well understood, the question can be turned on its head and becomes “why do we restrict ourselves to 2D pages and hyperlinks for all these activities?”
Navigating hierarchical data structures is often cumbersome for large data sets. Unfortunately, the Internet as we know is organized as a flat abstract mesh of interconnected hierarchical documents. A typical 2D website is an extremely abstract entity and consists of nothing but a bunch of documents and pictures. Within the website, at every level of the interaction, the developers have to provide the user immediate navigational help. Otherwise, the user would get lost sooner or later. Since this is a very abstract environment, there is no straightforward way of providing a navigation scheme which would be immediately recognizable to human beings. The situation is not any better when traveling between websites.. It is no surprise that Google is the most powerful Internet Company of our times.

World servers:

Provide user- or server-side created, static and dynamic content making up the specific webplace (3D environment) including visuals, physics engine, avatar data, media, and more to client programs. A world server has the important task of coordinating the co-existence of connected users, initiating communication between them, and ensuring in-world consistency in real time. They may also facilitate various services such as e-mail, instant saging, and more.

Avatar/ID servers:

Virtual identity management systems containing identity and avatar information as well as inventory (not only in world graphics but also documents, pictures, e-mails, etc.) of registered users and providing these to individual world servers and relevant client programs (owner, owner’s friends) while ensuring privacy and security of stored information. Avatar/ID servers can be part of world servers.

Intelligent Environments

Emerging fields such as ubiquitous computing and ambient intelligence draw heavily from adaptive and intelligent algorithms. They are concerned with computing and networking technology that is unobtrusively embedded in the everyday environment of human users. The emphasis is on user-friendliness, efficient and distributed services support, user empowerment, and support for human interactions. All this assumes a shift away from desktop or portable computers to a variety of devices accessible via intelligent interfaces.
The 3D Internet, which is a virtual ubiquitous computing environment, provides the perfect test bed for developing these ideas and emulating them in realistic 3D settings with real users.

Intelligent Services

In the case of the 3D Internet, the concept of intelligent environments naturally extends to underlying communication protocols and enabling services as well as to user centered services. Given its inherent P2P nature, the 3D Internet can make use of paradigms such as intelligent routing where mechanisms being aware of the network topology and information structure allow for flexible and context-dependent distribution of traffic. As in the real world, one could think of adaptive algorithms that control traffic flow depending on the time of day, user-behavior patterns, or a variety of global and local events.

Intelligent Agents and Rendering

In order to increase the users’ acceptance of services like the ones just mentioned, they will not just have to be personalized but also be presented and accessible in a way users will consider natural. This leads to the problem of modeling artificial agents and avatars that act life-like and show a behavior that would be considered natural and human-like. First attempts in this direction have already been made in the context of computer games. Here, machine learning has been shown to provide an auspicious avenue. The network traffic generated by a group of people playing a multiplayer game contains all the data necessary to describe their activities in the virtual game world. Statistical analysis of this traffic and a derivation of a generative model there from allows for implementing agents that are perceived to act more human-like. Corresponding approaches can be applied to improve on the quality of virtual clerks and information personnel.

Obstacles to Commercial Success in 3D Internet

Advertisers, marketers and organizations have yet to capitalize on the vast potential of the 3D Internet. Factors inhibiting the commercial usability of virtual worlds include:
• The limited effectiveness of traditional media techniques such as fixed-location billboards when applied to virtual worlds. In the 3D Internet, participants have complete control over where they go and what they do — and can move their avatars instantly through virtual space. What is required is a means for making content readily available to people not only at specific points, but throughout virtual worlds.
• Lack of an effective way for enabling people in virtual worlds to encounter commercial content that enhances their virtual experience. Because participants have a choice in whether to interact with an offering, it is essential that it be viewed as relevant and valuable to their particular goals in the 3D Internet.
• An inconsistent means for enabling in-world participants to easily interact with and access video, rich multimedia, and Web content.

Conclusions

3D Internet, also known as virtual worlds, is a powerful new way for you to reach consumers, business customers, co-workers, partners, and students. It combines the immediacy of television, the versatile content of the Web, and the relationship-building strengths of social networking sites like Face book. Yet unlike the passive experience of television, the 3D Internet is inherently interactive and engaging. Virtual worlds provide immersive 3D experiences that replicate (and in some cases exceed) real life.